About

Rob Wylie 
Denise Neunaber Wylie

 

Rob’s love of craftsmanship and restoration began bringing him to Raleigh in 2005 to help Denise restore a 1920s house that she bought with a vision but without a clue what she was getting in to. Soon, trips to work on the type of house that he loved turned into visits to see the woman he loved. Rob was always building things. Denise was always planning and dreaming things. They had known each other for five years before the house helped them realize their connection went beyond a common passion for crafting new works grounded in the past. Rob and Denise first met while attending Warren Wilson College in Asheville, NC. After graduation, Rob worked as a carpenter building houses. Craving more refined skills and a higher craft, Rob returned to school to earn a degree in Fine and Creative Woodworking at Rockingham Community College. While at RCC, Rob was a finalist in the top two national student furniture competitions.

After completing his degree, Rob was glad to trade the long commute for a job at a cabinet shop that was only a bike ride away from their downtown home. Rob worked building custom furniture and cabinetry for several years. After he and Denise had their daughter Emmeline in 2010, Rob put woodworking on hold to stay at home with her, but felt off kilter away from his craft. Rob built his own shop so he could get back to woodworking while continuing to stay at home with Emmeline and son Jake.

Now that their house is renovated and their new shop is constructed, Rob and Denise are launching themselves into another project. Wylie Woodworks is Rob and Denise’s first venture in sharing their love of creating new pieces with roots.

Wylie Woodworks brings together Rob’s woodworking skills and Denise’s designs and vision. The couple focuses on making pieces that give old materials new life and new pieces that will become heirlooms to give roots to future generations.

Current work is centered on wood that would commonly be considered defective and tossed aside because of knots, live edges, and grain that is difficult to work with. While others see imperfections, we see beauty. 

Current work is centered on wood that would commonly be considered defective and tossed aside because of knots, live edges, and grain that is difficult to work with. While others see imperfections, we see beauty.